Voorhees Township

New Jersey

Quick Facts

Place Type

Town

Administrative Entity

Camden County

Time Zone

America/New_York

Area Codes

856

Founding

March 1, 1899

Named After

Foster McGowan Voorhees

Elevation

34.0 meters

Area

11.644 square kilometers

FIPS 55-3 Code

34-76220

GNIS IDs

882153

Coordinates Latitude: 39.8519447 Longitude: -74.961517

Demographics & Economic Data

Population
Median Age
Number Of Companies
Percent High School Grad Or Higher
Total Housing Units
Median Household Income
Foreign Born Population
Percent Below Poverty Level
Race
Veterans

Subdivisions

Neighborhoods

About

Overview

Voorhees Township is a township in Camden County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 29,131, reflecting an increase of 1,005 (+3.6%) from the 28,126 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 3,567 (+14.5%) from the 24,559 counted in the 1990 Census. Voorhees is a New Jersey suburb in the Greater Philadelphia Metropolitan Area. Voorhees Township was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 1, 1899, from portions of Waterford Township. Portions of the township were taken on March 8, 1924, to form Gibbsboro.The township is named for Foster McGowan Voorhees, the Governor of New Jersey who authorized its creation.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 11.644 square miles (30.157 km2), including 11.492 square miles (29.764 km2) of land and 0.152 square miles (0.392 km2) of water (1.30%).Echelon (with a 2010 population of 10,743) is an unincorporated community and census-designated place in the western part of the township between Cherry Hill and Gibbsboro.Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Ashland, Brighton Heights, Glendale, Kirkwood, Kresson and Osage.Voorhees borders the Camden County communities of Berlin Township, Cherry Hill Township, Gibbsboro, Lindenwold, and Somerdale. To the east is Evesham Township in Burlington County.

Climate

Voorhees has a Humid Continental/Humid Subtropical transition climate according to (Köppen Classification) with mild to very cold winters and hot, humid summers. Temperatures have ranged from 104 °F to -7 °F.

Demographics

Census 2010

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 29,131 people, 11,470 households, and 7,432.560 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,534.9 per square mile (978.7/km2). There were 12,260 housing units at an average density of 1,066.8 per square mile (411.9/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 71.77% (20,908) White, 8.70% (2,534) Black or African American, 0.15% (44) Native American, 16.13% (4,700) Asian, 0.04% (11) Pacific Islander, 0.84% (246) from other races, and 2.36% (688) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.43% (998) of the population.There were 11,470 households out of which 30.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.8% were married couples living together, 8.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.2% were non-families. 29.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.14.In the township, the population was spread out with 22.1% under the age of 18, 6.8% from 18 to 24, 24.4% from 25 to 44, 30.1% from 45 to 64, and 16.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.6 years. For every 100 females there were 90.5 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 86.8 males.The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $82,146 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,405) and the median family income was $107,000 (+/- $4,910). Males had a median income of $72,430 (+/- $6,605) versus $51,322 (+/- $2,170) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $44,169 (+/- $2,717). About 4.0% of families and 6.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.9% of those under age 18 and 12.1% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 28,126 people, 10,489 households, and 7,069 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,424.0 people per square mile (936.2/km²). There were 11,084 housing units at an average density of 955.2 per square mile (368.9/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 78.26% White, 8.00% African American, 0.14% Native American, 11.44% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.55% from other races, and 1.59% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.47% of the population.There were 10,489 households out of which 37.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.0% were married couples living together, 7.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.6% were non-families. 26.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.23.In the township the population was spread out with 26.4% under the age of 18, 6.3% from 18 to 24, 31.8% from 25 to 44, 24.6% from 45 to 64, and 10.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 92.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.8 males.The median income for a household in the township was $68,402, and the median income for a family was $86,873. Males had a median income of $58,484 versus $38,897 for females. The per capita income for the township was $33,635. About 3.7% of families and 5.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.7% of those under age 18 and 11.1% of those age 65 or over.

Economy

New Jersey American Water, based in Voorhees Township, is the largest water utility in New Jersey, serving over two million people in 176 communities throughout the state. New Jersey American Water is a wholly owned subsidiary of American Water.

Sports

Voorhees is the home of the Skate Zone, a training facility for the Philadelphia Flyers of the NHL. Current and former players of the team often become residents of Voorhees. Voorhees includes a community park that includes a running track, children's playground, gazebo, and dedicated areas for dogs.
The Philadelphia Soul of the Arena Football League practiced at the Coliseum in Voorhees.


Government

Local government

The Township of Voorhees is governed under the Township form of New Jersey municipal government. The five-member Township Committee is elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle. The Mayor and Deputy Mayors are chosen by the Township Committee from among its members during the Reorganization meeting each January.
As of 2016, the members of the Voorhees Township Committee are Mayor Michael R. Mignogna (D, term on committee ends December 31, 2017; term as mayor ends 2016), Deputy Mayor Deputy Mayor Jason A. Ravitz (D, term on committee ends 2018; term as deputy mayor ends 2016), Michael Friedman (R, 2016), Deputy Mayor, Director of Public Safety and Committeewomen Michelle M. Nocito (D, 2018) and Harry A. Platt (D, 2017).


Federal, state and county representation

Voorhees Township is located in the 1st Congressional District and is part of New Jersey's 6th state legislative district.For the 116th United States Congress, New Jersey's First Congressional District is represented by Donald Norcross (D, Camden). New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021) and Bob Menendez (Paramus, term ends 2025).For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 6th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by James Beach (D, Voorhees Township) and in the General Assembly by Louis Greenwald (D, Voorhees Township) and Pamela Rosen Lampitt (D, Cherry Hill). The Governor of New Jersey is Phil Murphy (D, Middletown Township). The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Sheila Oliver (D, East Orange).Camden County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose seven members chosen at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election each year. As of 2018, Camden County's Freeholders are
Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli Jr. (D, Collingswood, term as freeholder ends December 31, 2020; term as director ends 2018),
Freeholder Deputy Director Edward T. McDonnell (D, Pennsauken Township, term as freeholder ends 2019; term as deputy director ends 2018),
Susan Shin Angulo (D, Cherry Hill, 2018),
William F. Moen Jr. (D, Camden, 2018),
Jeffrey L. Nash (D, Cherry Hill, 2018),
Carmen Rodriguez (D, Merchantville, 2019) and
Jonathan L. Young Sr. (D, Berlin Township, 2020).Camden County's constitutional officers, all elected directly by voters, are
County clerk Joseph Ripa (Voorhees Township, 2019),
Sheriff Gilbert "Whip" Wilson (Camden, 2018) and
Surrogate Michelle Gentek-Mayer (Gloucester Township, 2020). The Camden County Prosecutor is Mary Eva Colalillo.











Politics

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 19,762 registered voters in Voorhees Township, of which 7,392 (37.4%) were registered as Democrats, 3,129 (15.8%) were registered as Republicans and 9,229 (46.7%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 12 voters registered to other parties.In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 60.3% of the vote (8,479 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 38.7% (5,450 votes), and other candidates with 1.0% (137 votes), among the 14,160 ballots cast by the township's 21,493 registered voters (94 ballots were sp oi led), for a turnout of 65.9%. In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 61.1% of the vote (9,028 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain, who received around 35.3% (5,216 votes), with 14,768 ballots cast among the township's 19,553 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.5%. In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 57.5% of the vote (7,835 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush, who received around 40.2% (5,475 votes), with 13,628 ballots cast among the township's 18,325 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 74.4.In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 61.4% of the vote (4,679 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 37.4% (2,851 votes), and other candidates with 1.2% (95 votes), among the 7,845 ballots cast by the township's 21,636 registered voters (220 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 36.3%. In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 50.% of the vote (4,126 ballots cast), ahead of both Republican Chris Christie with 44.2% (3,645 votes) and Independent Chris Daggett with 3.8% (315 votes), with 8,248 ballots cast among the township's 19,611 registered voters, yielding a 42.1% turnout.In the 2016 presidential election, Democrat Hillary Clinton received 60.8% of the vote (9,037 cast), ahead of Republican Donald Trump with 34% (5050 votes), and other candidates with 3.0% (447 votes), among the 14,862 ballots cast by the township's 21,393 registered, for a turnout of 69.5%.

Education

Students in kindergarten through eighth grade attend the Voorhees Township Public Schools. As of the 2013-14 school year, the district's five schools had an enrollment of 2,994 students and 236.8 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.6:1. Schools in the district (with 2013-14 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics) are four elementary schools –
Edward T. Hamilton Elementary School (grades K-5; 413 students),
Kresson Elementary School (K-5; 342),
Osage Elementary School (K-5; 657) and
Signal Hill Elementary School (PreK-5; 478) – and
Voorhees Middle School (1,104 in grades 6-8). In 2003, Edward T. Hamilton Elementary School was recognized as a National Blue Ribbon School by the United States Department of Education, one of 233 selected nationwide.Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend the Eastern Camden County Regional High School District, a limited-purpose, public regional school district that serves students at Eastern Regional High School from the constituent communities of Berlin Borough, Gibbsboro and Voorhees Township. As of the 2014-15 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 2,014 students and 144.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 14.0:1.Voorhees is also the home of two private schools. Kellman Brown Academy (formerly Harry B. Kellman Academy) is a private Jewish day school serving children aged 3 through 8th grade which had an enrollment of 206 students as of the 2011-12 school year. The school was founded in 1958 in association with Congregation Beth El at Parkside in Camden and has been located in Voorhees independently since October 2008 as part of the Solomon Schechter Day School Association.Naudain Academy is a Montessori education program for children from preschool to kindergarten, located near Kresson Elementary School. Naudain Academy first opened in 1977.The largest branch of the Camden County Library is located in Voorhees. Officially named the M. Allan Vogelson Regional Branch, it was established in 1969.






Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 119.81 miles (192.82 km) of roadways, of which 96.90 miles (155.95 km) were maintained by the municipality, 20.50 miles (32.99 km) by Camden County and 2.41 miles (3.88 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.The only major highway that passes through Voorhees is Route 73 (Berlin-Kresson Road), which travels from the southern border with Berlin Township towards Evesham Township in Burlington County. Interstate 295 and Route 70 provide access to nearby Philadelphia via Cherry Hill Township. Exit 32 of Interstate 295 is partially signed for Voorhees, though motorists can also use exits 29A (U.S. Route 30/Berlin), 31 (Woodcrest Station) or 36 (Route 73) to access parts of the township.
County Route 544 (Evesham Road) runs along the border with Cherry Hill on the north side of the township and County Route 561 (Haddonfield-Berlin Road) clips the southwest corner of the township, from Berlin Township in the south, passes through Gibbsboro, reenters the township's northwest corner before heading into Cherry Hill.


Public transportation

One station on the PATCO Speedline rail system, Ashland, is located within township limits. The Woodcrest and Lindenwold stations are also easily accessible to many residents.
NJ Transit bus service is offered between the township and Philadelphia on the 403 route, with local service provided by the 451 and 459 routes.


Notable people

People (and animals) who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Voorhees Township include:

Ron Anderson (born 1958), played on several NBA teams, as well as in Europe.
Eli Apple (born 1995), football cornerback for the New York Giants.
Andrew Bailey (born 1984), All-Star closer for the Boston Red Sox.
Hank Baskett (born 1982), free agent wide receiver who had played for the Philadelphia Eagles.
James Beach (born 1946), member of the New Jersey Senate.
Barrett Brooks (born 1972), offensive tackle for the Pittsburgh Steelers.
Stanley Brotman (1924-2014), Judge of the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey.
Chris Canty (born 1976), former professional football cornerback.
Sarah Chang (born 1980), violinist.
Prince Chunk (1998–2010), a cat that weighed as much as 44 pounds (20 kg).
Brian Dawkins (born 1973), former free safety for the Philadelphia Eagles.
Pervis Ellison (born 1967), basketball player who played for 11 NBA seasons and was the first player selected in the 1989 NBA Draft.
Josh Farro (born 1987), former guitarist of the pop-punk band Paramore. Currently in the band Farro.
Zac Farro (born 1990), drummer with Half Noise who is former drummer of pop-punk band Paramore.
Joe Flacco (born 1985), quarterback who plays for the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League.
Christina Foggie (born 1992), professional basketball player, who was drafted in 2014 by the Minnesota Lynx of the WNBA.
English Gardner (born 1992), track and field sprinter who specializes in the 100-meter dash.
Arie Gill-Glick (1930-2016), Israeli Olympic runner.
Mike Golic Jr. (born 1989), football offensive guard for the Arizona Rattlers of the Arena Football League.
Scott Graham (born 1965), former sports broadcaster for the Philadelphia Phillies.
Louis Greenwald (born 1967), represents the 6th Legislative District in the New Jersey General Assembly.
Dana Hall (born 1969), jazz drummer, percussionist, composer, bandleader, and ethnomusicologist.
Ron Jaworski (born 1951), former NFL player on the Philadelphia Eagles.
Jill Kelley (born 1975), socialite whose emails led to disclosure of the Petraeus scandal.
Craig MacTavish (born 1958), former NHL hockey player.
Jimmy McGriff (1936–2008), jazz and blues organist.
Tommy Paul (born 1997), professional tennis player.
Raoul Peck (born 1953), award-winning Haitian filmmaker.
Rev. Scott Pilarz, S.J., (born 1959), Jesuit priest and academic who served as President of Marquette University.
Mary Previte (born 1932), member of the New Jersey General Assembly who represented the 6th Legislative District from 1998 to 2006.
Keith Primeau (born 1971), played on the Philadelphia Flyers.
Molly Schaus (born 1988), ice hockey goaltender who played for the United States women's national ice hockey team that won the silver medal at the 2010 Winter Olympics.
Lauren Schmetterling (born 1988), rower, three-time World Rowing Championships gold medalist, Olympic gold medalist.
Mel Shaw (1946-2017), racing driver who competed in the 24 Hours of Daytona and died at age 70 in a Trans-Am Series crash at Brainerd International Raceway.
Devin Smeltzer (born 1995), professional baseball pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers organization.
Chris St. Croix (born 1979), hockey defenseman.
Adam Taliaferro (born 1982), played on the Penn State Nittany Lions football team.
Jeremy Thompson (born 1985), NFL player for the Green Bay Packers.
Madison Tiernan (born 1995), soccer midfielder who plays for Sky Blue FC of National Women's Soccer League.
Phil Trautwein (born 1986), offensive tackle who has played for the St. Louis Rams.
Julia Udine (born 1993), actress who performed as Christine on the North American tour of The Phantom of the Opera.
John Vukovich (1947–2007), former MLB third baseman, best known for his career with the Philadelphia Phillies.
Toyelle Wilson (born 1981), assistant basketball coach with the Baylor Lady Bears basketball team.
Kelsi Worrell (born 1994), American competition swimmer specializing in the butterfly who won the gold medal in the 100-meter butterfly at the 2015 Pan American Games in Toronto.
Brandon Wynn (born 1988), artistic gymnast who won a bronze medal in the Still Rings event at the 2013 World Artistic Gymnastics Championships.













































Images

Online Resources

Official Website

References