Fredon Township

New Jersey

Quick Facts

Place Type

Town

Administrative Entity

Sussex County

Time Zone

America/New_York

Founding

Jan. 1, 1904

Elevation

830.0 meters

Area

17.999 square kilometers

FIPS 55-3 Code

34-25140

GNIS IDs

882268

Coordinates Latitude: 41.0392638 Longitude: -74.8087781

Demographics & Economic Data

Population
Median Age
Number Of Companies
Percent High School Grad Or Higher
Total Housing Units
Median Household Income
Foreign Born Population
Percent Below Poverty Level
Race
Veterans

About

Overview

Fredon Township ( FREE-dən) is a township in Sussex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 3,437, reflecting an increase of 577 (+20.2%) from the 2,860 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 97 (+3.5%) from the 2,763 counted in the 1990 Census.In 1800, Isaac V. Coursen named the Stillwater Township area "Coursen's Corners" after establishing a post office in his store, the Coursen House, but changed the name to Fredon Village before his death in 1855. Stillwater Township's Bicentennial Committee obtained information from the Postmaster General which "states that 'Fredon' is derived from the German word 'fredonia,' meaning place of freedom." Fredon Township was incorporated on February 24, 1904, from portions of Andover Township, Green Township, Hampton Township and Stillwater Township.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 17.999 square miles (46.617 km2), including 17.720 square miles (45.896 km2) of land and 0.279 square mile (0.722 km2) of water (1.55%).Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Hunts Pond, Muckshaw Pond and Stillwater.Hampton and Stillwater Townships border Fredon on the northwest. It was along this border, through the Paulinskill Valley, that the New York, Susquehanna and Western Railway operated from 1872 until 1962, taking agricultural products to New York City. Today the right-of-way has been developed into the Paulinskill Valley Trail, a non-motorized multi-use trail that is part of the Kittatinny Valley State Park.

Demographics

Census 2010

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 3,437 people, 1,207 households, and 972.842 families residing in the township. The population density was 194.0 per square mile (74.9/km2). There were 1,289 housing units at an average density of 72.7 per square mile (28.1/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 96.04% (3,301) White, 0.52% (18) Black or African American, 0.12% (4) Native American, 1.69% (58) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.61% (21) from other races, and 1.02% (35) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.70% (127) of the population.There were 1,207 households out of which 35.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 71.9% were married couples living together, 6.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.4% were non-families. 15.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.84 and the average family size was 3.18.In the township, the population was spread out with 25.7% under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 21.0% from 25 to 44, 33.6% from 45 to 64, and 13.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.3 years. For every 100 females there were 99.6 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 97.1 males.The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $104,074 (with a margin of error of +/- $9,084) and the median family income was $110,000 (+/- $10,332). Males had a median income of $78,000 (+/- $7,722) versus $42,981 (+/- $6,474) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $40,761 (+/- $4,361). About 0.0% of families and 1.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 6.3% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 2,860 people, 982 households, and 818 families residing in the township. The population density was 161.1 people per square mile (62.2/km²). There were 1,019 housing units at an average density of 57.4 per square mile (22.2/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 97.17% White, 0.52% African American, 0.24% Native American, 0.84% Asian, 0.56% from other races, and 0.66% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.17% of the population.There were 982 households out of which 39.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 75.5% were married couples living together, 6.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 16.7% were non-families. 13.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.89 and the average family size was 3.18.In the township the population was spread out with 26.6% under the age of 18, 5.2% from 18 to 24, 29.3% from 25 to 44, 29.5% from 45 to 64, and 9.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.4 males.The median income for a household in the township was $75,710, and the median income for a family was $84,038. Males had a median income of $52,396 versus $34,205 for females. The per capita income for the township was $31,430. About 0.7% of families and 2.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.9% of those under age 18 and 3.4% of those age 65 or over.

Government

Local government

Fredon Township is governed under the Township form of government. The five-member Township Committee is elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle. At an annual reorganization meeting held during the first week of January, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor.
As of 2016, members of the Fredon Township Committee are Mayor George A. Green, IV (R, term on township committee ends December 31, 2017; term as mayor ends 2016), Deputy Mayor John H. Heine (R, term on committee ends 2017; term as deputy mayor ends 2016), John A. W. Richardson Sr. (R, 2018), Keith Smith (R, 2016; appointed to serve an unexpired term until November 2016) and Anthony P. Thonnerieux (R, 2018).In December 2015, the Township Committee appointed Keith Smith to fill the seat expiring in December 2016 that had been held by former mayor Carl F. Lazzaro until he resigned to run for and win a seat as a Sussex County Freeholder; Smith will serve on an interim basis until the November 2016 general election, when voters will select a candidate to serve the balance of the term of office.


Federal, state and county representation

Fredon Township is located in the 5th Congressional District and is part of New Jersey's 24th state legislative district.For the 116th United States Congress, New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Josh Gottheimer (D, Wyckoff). New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021) and Bob Menendez (Paramus, term ends 2025).For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 24th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Steve Oroho (R, Franklin) and in the General Assembly by Parker Space (R, Wantage Township) and Harold J. Wirths (R, Hardyston Township). The Governor of New Jersey is Phil Murphy (D, Middletown Township). The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Sheila Oliver (D, East Orange).Sussex County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Freeholder Director and Deputy Director from among its members, with day-to-day supervision of the operation of the county delegated to a County Administrator. As of 2014, Sussex County's Freeholders are
Freeholder Director Richard Vohden (R, Green Township, 2016),
Deputy Director Dennis J. Mudrick (R, Sparta Township, 2015),
Phillip R. Crabb (R, Franklin, 2014),
George Graham (R, Stanhope, 2016) and
Gail Phoebus (R, Andover Township, 2015). Graham was chosen in April 2013 to fill the seat vacated by Parker Space, who had been chosen to fill a vacancy in the New Jersey General Assembly.
Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are
County Clerk Jeff Parrott (R, 2016),
Sheriff Michael F. Strada (R, 2016) and
Surrogate Gary R. Chiusano (R, filling the vacancy after the resignation of Nancy Fitzgibbons). The County Administrator is John Eskilson.










Politics

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 2,394 registered voters in Fredon Township, of which 316 (13.2% vs. 16.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,136 (47.5% vs. 39.3%) were registered as Republicans and 941 (39.3% vs. 44.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There was one voter registered to another party. Among the township's 2010 Census population, 69.7% (vs. 65.8% in Sussex County) were registered to vote, including 93.7% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 86.5% countywide).In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 1,237 votes (65.6% vs. 59.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 610 votes (32.3% vs. 38.2%) and other candidates with 33 votes (1.7% vs. 2.1%), among the 1,887 ballots cast by the township's 2,478 registered voters, for a turnout of 76.2% (vs. 68.3% in Sussex County). In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 1,269 votes (64.4% vs. 59.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 654 votes (33.2% vs. 38.7%) and other candidates with 40 votes (2.0% vs. 1.5%), among the 1,970 ballots cast by the township's 2,405 registered voters, for a turnout of 81.9% (vs. 76.9% in Sussex County). In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 1,202 votes (67.5% vs. 63.9% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 553 votes (31.1% vs. 34.4%) and other candidates with 21 votes (1.2% vs. 1.3%), among the 1,780 ballots cast by the township's 2,150 registered voters, for a turnout of 82.8% (vs. 77.7% in the whole county).In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 76.9% of the vote (864 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 19.7% (221 votes), and other candidates with 3.4% (38 votes), among the 1,138 ballots cast by the township's 2,464 registered voters (15 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 46.2%. In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 911 votes (67.7% vs. 63.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 297 votes (22.1% vs. 25.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 120 votes (8.9% vs. 9.1%) and other candidates with 15 votes (1.1% vs. 1.3%), among the 1,346 ballots cast by the township's 2,370 registered voters, yielding a 56.8% turnout (vs. 52.3% in the county).

Education

Public school students are served by the Fredon Township School District for kindergarten through sixth grade at Fredon Township School. As of the 2014-15 school year, the district and its one school had an enrollment of 534 students and 23.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 22.8:1. Fredon School was awarded the National Blue Ribbon Award for Academic Excellence in November 2001, the highest level of recognition granted to an American school.Students in seventh through twelfth grade for public school attend Kittatinny Regional High School located in Hampton Township, which serves students who reside in Fredon Township, Hampton Township, Sandyston Township, Stillwater Township and Walpack Township. The high school is located on a 96-acre (39 ha) campus in Hampton Township, about seven minutes outside of the county seat of Newton. As of the 2014-15 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 1,079 students and 97.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.1:1. Kittatinny Regional High School was recognized as a National Blue Ribbon School of Excellence in 1997-98.

Transportation

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 51.38 miles (82.69 km) of roadways, of which 31.94 miles (51.40 km) were maintained by the municipality, 13.13 miles (21.13 km) by Sussex County and 6.31 miles (10.15 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.New Jersey Route 94 is the main highway serving Fredon Township. County Route 519 is the only other significant road traversing the township.

Notable people

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Fredon Township include:

Delicate Steve (stage name of Steve Marion), recording artist signed to David Byrne's Luaka Bop Records.
Uli Derickson (1944-2005), flight attendant best known for her role in helping protect 152 passengers and crew members during the June 14, 1985 hijacking of TWA Flight 847.
Charles Joseph Fletcher (1922-2011), inventor and the owner / CEO of Technology General Corporation who developed an early version of the hovercraft.



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