Alloway

New Jersey

Quick Facts

Place Type

Town

Administrative Entity

Salem County

Time Zone

America/New_York

Founding

Jan. 1, 1767

Elevation

62.0 meters

Area

33.834 square kilometers

FIPS 55-3 Code

34-00880

GNIS IDs

882131

Coordinates Latitude: 39.5556617 Longitude: -75.3178952

Demographics & Economic Data

Population
Median Age
Number Of Companies
Percent High School Grad Or Higher
Total Housing Units
Median Household Income
Foreign Born Population
Percent Below Poverty Level
Race
Veterans

About

Overview

Alloway Township is a township in Salem County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 3,467, reflecting an increase of 693 (+25.0%) from the 2,774 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 21 (-0.8%) from the 2,795 counted in the 1990 Census. What is now Alloway was formally incorporated as Upper Alloways Creek Township by a Royal charter granted on June 17, 1767, from portions of the now-defunct Alloways Creek Township. The township was formally incorporated by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798. Quinton Township was formed from portions of the township on February 18, 1873. The name was officially changed to Alloway Township as of February 21, 1884.The name Alloway is derivative of Allowas, a local Native American chief.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 33.834 square miles (87.630 km2), including 33.402 square miles (86.510 km2) of land and 0.432 square miles (1.120 km2) of water (1.28%).Alloway (with a 2010 Census population of 1,402) is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) located within Alloway Township. Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Aldine, Alloway Junction, Dilkes Mile, Friesburg, Lake Sycamore, Mower, New Boston, Oakland, Penton, Remsterville, Riddleton and Watsons Mills.The township borders Upper Pittsgrove Township, Pilesgrove Township, Mannington Township, Quinton Township, and Cumberland County.

Demographics

Census 2010

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 3,467 people, 1,193 households, and 944.856 families residing in the township. The population density was 103.8 per square mile (40.1/km2). There were 1,268 housing units at an average density of 38.0 per square mile (14.7/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 91.49% (3,172) White, 5.08% (176) Black or African American, 0.43% (15) Native American, 0.89% (31) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.61% (21) from other races, and 1.50% (52) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.96% (68) of the population.There were 1,193 households out of which 34.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.6% were married couples living together, 6.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.8% were non-families. 17.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.84 and the average family size was 3.21.In the township, the population was spread out with 26.2% under the age of 18, 7.8% from 18 to 24, 23.2% from 25 to 44, 30.8% from 45 to 64, and 11.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.1 years. For every 100 females there were 101.9 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 102.5 males.The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $86,979 (with a margin of error of +/- $8,158) and the median family income was $91,979 (+/- $8,633). Males had a median income of $61,544 (+/- $11,567) versus $35,528 (+/- $2,497) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $27,649 (+/- $2,963). About 4.6% of families and 5.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.9% of those under age 18 and 19.1% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 2,774 people, 948 households, and 742 families residing in the township. The population density was 84.5 people per square mile (32.6/km2). There were 995 housing units at an average density of 30.3 per square mile (11.7/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 90.70% White, 6.89% African American, 0.54% Native American, 0.43% Asian, 0.40% from other races, and 1.05% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.38% of the population.There were 948 households out of which 36.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.8% were married couples living together, 7.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.7% were non-families. 18.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.80 and the average family size was 3.19.In the township the population was spread out with 28.1% under the age of 18, 6.8% from 18 to 24, 29.0% from 25 to 44, 23.8% from 45 to 64, and 12.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 103.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 105.0 males.The median income for a household in the township was $56,528, and the median income for a family was $65,132. Males had a median income of $43,839 versus $27,188 for females. The per capita income for the township was $22,935. About 4.5% of families and 8.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.1% of those under age 18 and 4.6% of those age 65 or over.

Government

Local government

Alloway is governed under the township form of New Jersey municipal government. The three-member township committee is elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one seat coming up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting, the council selects one of its members to serves as mayor and another as deputy mayor.As of 2018, the Alloway Township Committee consists of Mayor K. Myrle Patrick (R, term on committee ends December 31, 2019; term as mayor ends 2019), Deputy Mayor Beth F. Reilly (R, term on committee and as deputy mayor ends 2018) and Warren Morgan, III (D, 2020).

Federal, state and county representation

Alloway Township is located in the 2nd Congressional district and is part of New Jersey's 3rd state legislative district.For the 116th United States Congress, New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Jeff Van Drew (D, Dennis Township). New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021) and Bob Menendez (Paramus, term ends 2025).For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 3rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Stephen M. Sweeney (D, West Deptford Township) and in the General Assembly by John J. Burzichelli (D, Paulsboro) and Adam Taliaferro (D, Woolwich Township). The Governor of New Jersey is Phil Murphy (D, Middletown Township). The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Sheila Oliver (D, East Orange).Salem County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders who are elected at-large to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Director and a Deputy Director from among its members. As of 2014, Salem County's Freeholders (with party, residence, term-end year and committee chairmanship listed in parentheses) are
Director Julie A. Acton (R, Pennsville Township, 2016; Administration),
Deputy Director Dale A. Cross (R, Pennsville Township, 2014; Public Safety),
Bruce L. Bobbitt (D, Pilesgrove Township, 2014; Public Services),
Ben Laury (R, Elmer, 2015; Public Works),
Beth E. Timberman (D, Woodstown, 2015; Social Services),
Robert J. Vanderslice (R, Pennsville Township, 2014; Health and Human Services) and
Lee R. Ware (D, Elsinboro Township, 2016; Transportation, Agriculture and Cultural Affairs). Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are
County Clerk Gilda T. Gill (2014),
Sheriff Charles M. Miller (2015) and
Surrogate Nicki A. Burke (2015).











Politics

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 2,269 registered voters in Alloway Township, of which 509 (22.4% vs. 30.6% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 596 (26.3% vs. 21.0%) were registered as Republicans and 1,163 (51.3% vs. 48.4%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There was one voter registered to another party. Among the township's 2010 Census population, 65.4% (vs. 64.6% in Salem County) were registered to vote, including 88.7% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 84.4% countywide).In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 58.5% of the vote (1,019 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 39.7% (691 votes), and other candidates with 1.8% (31 votes), among the 1,754 ballots cast by the township's 2,412 registered voters (13 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 72.7%. In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 1,011 votes (56.5% vs. 46.6% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 731 votes (40.8% vs. 50.4%) and other candidates with 32 votes (1.8% vs. 1.6%), among the 1,790 ballots cast by the township's 2,312 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.4% (vs. 71.8% in Salem County). In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 1,060 votes (62.6% vs. 52.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 609 votes (36.0% vs. 45.9%) and other candidates with 15 votes (0.9% vs. 1.0%), among the 1,693 ballots cast by the township's 2,172 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.9% (vs. 71.0% in the whole county).In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 68.1% of the vote (770 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 27.8% (314 votes), and other candidates with 4.1% (46 votes), among the 1,138 ballots cast by the township's 2,397 registered voters (8 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 47.5%. In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 660 votes (55.4% vs. 46.1% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 368 votes (30.9% vs. 39.9%), Independent Chris Daggett with 137 votes (11.5% vs. 9.7%) and other candidates with 17 votes (1.4% vs. 2.0%), among the 1,192 ballots cast by the township's 2,302 registered voters, yielding a 51.8% turnout (vs. 47.3% in the county).

Education

The Alloway Township School District serves students in public school for pre-kindergarten through eighth grade at Alloway Township School. As of the 2014-15 school year, the district's one school had an enrollment of 563 students and 30.7 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 18.4:1.Students in public school for ninth through twelfth grades attend Woodstown High School in Woodstown, which serves students from Pilesgrove Township and Woodstown, along with students from Alloway Township, Oldmans Township and Upper Pittsgrove Township who attend the high school as part of sending/receiving relationships with the Woodstown-Pilesgrove Regional School District. As of the 2015-16 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 669 students and 53.5 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.5:1.

Transportation

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 79.86 miles (128.52 km) of roadways, of which 36.66 miles (59.00 km) were maintained by the municipality and 43.20 miles (69.52 km) by Salem County.New Jersey Route 77 passes through the far eastern corner of the township. County Route 540 and County Route 581 also traverse the township.

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